Does Your Chewing Gum Loose it’s Flavour on the Bedpost Overnight? My blog portfolio.

Well what a ride this has been, as they say back in the day, surprisingly, (not that word)...  it has been a blast!! I choose the title for my final blog as a tribute/nod to my modernities colleagues, because they get to study the surreal, out there stuff, I decide to have a piece of … Continue reading Does Your Chewing Gum Loose it’s Flavour on the Bedpost Overnight? My blog portfolio.

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Literature and IT Review.

MA Irish Writing and Film: Theories and Traditions Literature and IT Review. My MA thesis intends to argue that the prevalence of death in Marina Carr’s plays recognises the imposition of Ireland’s funerary tradition and crisis of soul loss in the form of stagnation and stasis, particularly highlighting, its detrimental impact on womanhood and motherhood … Continue reading Literature and IT Review.

UCC Textualities Conference 2017 #textualities17, ‘Live Blog Panel 3’.

Welcome to UCC's Textualities Conference 2017, Panel 3. The chair of Panel 3, Josephine Fenton, introduces the presenters, outlines their MA programs, wider research interests and the titles of their presentations. All presentations are delivered in the pechaKucha format, which is a presentation comprising twenty slides taking twenty seconds each. The first speaker is Cian … Continue reading UCC Textualities Conference 2017 #textualities17, ‘Live Blog Panel 3’.

‘Bright Star, Elegy for David Bowie’ Graham Allen…and other star people.

Graham Allen is a professor of English at University College Cork and The Madhouse System (2016) is his second collection of poems, following on from The One That Got Away (2014). Both are collections of poems that capture life in its wonder, pain, madness, hypocrisy, and joy. For some reason stones recur, I don't know why. I … Continue reading ‘Bright Star, Elegy for David Bowie’ Graham Allen…and other star people.

Literary Review: Ireland The Autobiography

I received a number of books this Christmas the above being one. The book jacket states: Over the past hundred years, Ireland has undergone profound political, social and cultural changes. But one thing that has not changed is the Irish genius for observation and storytelling, invective and self-scrutiny. Ireland: The Autobiography draws upon this genius … Continue reading Literary Review: Ireland The Autobiography

Literary Review: “The Cambridge Companion to Modern Irish Culture”.

The Cambridge Guide to Modern Irish Culture. Edited by Joe Cleary and Claire Connolly. The companion states: it provides an authoritative introduction to the historical, social and stylistic complexities of modern Irish culture. Readers will be introduced to Irish studies in its widest sense and helped to find their way through the cultural and theoretical … Continue reading Literary Review: “The Cambridge Companion to Modern Irish Culture”.

Reading Rebellion: Women, History, and Commemoration.

On the 16th November 2016, at University College Cork, Dr Heather Laird gave a research seminar paper, 'Reading Rebellion: Women, History, and Commemoration' which analysed RTE's flagship 1916 commemorative TV project, Rebellion. Dr Laird began by discussing some of the challenges history affords us, citing Ged Martin's work, 'Past Futures: The Impossible Necessity of History (University of … Continue reading Reading Rebellion: Women, History, and Commemoration.

What the world needs now is love sweet love…..lets have a chat about nationalism

Never has the music and lyrics of Burt Bacharach and Hal David resonated so poignantly as on the day Leonard Cohen passed away (he reportedly died on Tuesday 8th November 2016, announced on the 10th), the day the people of the United States of America (did we ever envisage questioning the term 'united'?) elected Donald … Continue reading What the world needs now is love sweet love…..lets have a chat about nationalism

Was John Ford’s ‘The Quiet Man’ the ‘Riverdance’ of the 1950s?

Two pieces of Irish cultural output, both on screen, resonate deeply, not only with Irish people but across the globe in an unprecedented manner. The first occurs in 1952 with the release of John Ford's The Quiet Man and the second in 1994 at the Eurovision song contest, when the interval act  Riverdance causes a … Continue reading Was John Ford’s ‘The Quiet Man’ the ‘Riverdance’ of the 1950s?